Dog Show

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Dog Show

 

The fourth consecutive Well dog Show held in October '03 was a trendsetter of sorts.Earlier shows had been held in our premises in August to go with the national pride in owning all things Indian .This time , at the request of the school that approached us, we held the show later and at their premises which proved to be a wonderful oppurtunity to reach out to children too.The Velammal Matric Higher Secondary School in Mogappair, had previously held dog shows in their school, exclusively for their students but they were fascinated by the concept of the Mongrel dog show and the concern for these homeless animals which culminated in their hosting our fourth dog show at the school premises.As a goodwill gesture towards their school students, Blue Cross relented to accept entries of pedigrees too ,only from the students,though.We were pleasantly surprised to see that an equal half of the school entries had mongrels!

 

An added advantage of holding the show in Mogappair was that people who were unable to come all the way to our Guindy shelter eagerly took part this time and were excited at the prospect of a Sunday outing for their pets in the spacious surroundings of the school.This has encouraged us to hold our show every year in a different school in a different location so as to make it easier for the residents of that area to take part.We have already received offers from schools which have Karuna Clubs who are eager to add this new dimension to their activities.

 

As always , we had various prizes in various categories plus a raffle so as to allow as many pets as is possible to be winners.The special categories are carefully chosen to encourage people to accept and appreciate their pets as they are and to erase superstitions about their appearances. 

 

Our judges for the show this year were- Dr T.P Sekar ,Chief Veterinarian of Blue Cross who chipped in his experience and patience with over 85 entries and Dr Priyadarshini Govind, a young and committed veterinarian who has helped out in various animal welfare organisations as and when her time and busy schedule permits. She was also the recipient of the Young Achiever Award given by the People for Animals, for this year.

 

Mr.P.Thangaraj,Dean, Veterinary college, as the Chief Guest, spoke to the students on the importance of keeping a pet at home and also taking good care of it.Mr.Vijay Adhiraj, a popular TV star gave away the prizes and also recounted his experiences with his pets,some of whom have been mongrels. 

 

The prize winners were as follows.

  • Sterilised male - Browny of Padmavathi and Muthu of Yashodara.
  • Sterilised female - Blackie of Padmavathi .
  • Non Sterilised male - Benjy of Lisa and Tyson of Senthilkumar
  • Non Sterilised female - Jimmy of Jayaprakash and Tommy of Anuradha.
  • Pups - Becky of Vivian and Segappy of Gokulkrishna
  • Oldest - Pepsi of Anuradha
  • Curliest tail - Tiger of Ganesh
  • Friendliest - Pinky of Senthilkumar
  • Oddest markings - Browny of Padmavathy
  • Healthiest - Twinky of Prasanna.
  • From the school, Ebony of Benjamin, Julie of Aishwarya and Snow of Sushil.

 

The oldest dog category had a special cash prize of Rs 250, sponsored by the owners of Tiny,who lived up to the grand old age of 20 before succumbing last year.They also sponsored the garlands for the prize winners while Mrs Nora Subramani painstakingly made silk medals for them.We thank them for their generosity and enthusiasm. We also thank Messrs Vivek and Co for sponsoring the raffle prizes

 

An adoption program was also held along with the show and all the 33 puppies brought from Blue Cross were snapped within moments of reaching the school that our prepared speech on why mongrels should be adopted became unneccesary!! Most of the students also decided that they will only adopt mongrels or abandoned pets from animal shelters and not buy their pets anymore.Which is exactly what Blue Cross is striving for.The concept of the Mongrel Dog Show is to encourage pet owners to show the world and take pride in their non pedigree dogs and for new owners to go in for these homeless animals . When reputed schools join the cause, it makes it that much easier for us to reach out.Thank you Velammal ,for pioneering the trend.

 

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Animals can suffer like humans do, so it is speciesism to experiment on them while we refrain from experimenting on humans. All suffering is undesirable, whether it be in humans or animals. Discriminating against animals because they do not have the cognitive ability, language, or moral judgment that humans do is no more justifiable than discriminating against human beings with severe mental impairments. As English philosopher Jeremy Bentham wrote in the 1700s, "The question is not, Can they reason? nor, Can they talk? but, Can they suffer?"

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Animal tests do not reliably predict results in human beings. 94% of drugs that pass animal tests fail in human clinical trials. According to neurologist Aysha Akhtar, MD, MPH, over 100 stroke drugs that were effective when tested on animals have failed in humans, and over 85 HIV vaccines failed in humans after working well in non-human primates. A 2013 study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) found that nearly 150 clinical trials of treatments to reduce inflammation in critically ill patients have been undertaken, and all of them failed, despite being successful in animal tests. A 2013 study in Archives of Toxicology stated that "The low predictivity of animal experiments in research areas allowing direct comparisons of mouse versus human data puts strong doubt on the usefulness of animal data as key technology to predict human safety."

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Drugs that pass animal tests are not necessarily safe. The 1950s sleeping pill thalidomide, which caused 10,000 babies to be born with severe deformities, was tested on animals prior to its commercial release. Animal tests on the arthritis drug Vioxx showed that it had a protective effect on the hearts of mice, yet the drug went on to cause more than 27,000 heart attacks and sudden cardiac deaths before being pulled from the market.

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Animals are very different from human beings and therefore make poor test subjects. The anatomic, metabolic, and cellular differences between animals and people make animals poor models for human beings. Paul Furlong, Professor of Clinical Neuroimaging at Aston University (UK), states that "it's very hard to create an animal model that even equates closely to what we're trying to achieve in the human." Thomas Hartung, Professor of evidence-based toxicology at Johns Hopkins University, argues for alternatives to animal testing because "we are not 70 kg rats."

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Stop Animal testing!
Use alternative testing methods!

Alternative testing methods now exist that can replace the need for animals. In vitro (in glass) testing, such as studying cell cultures in a petri dish, can produce more relevant results than animal testing because human cells can be used. Microdosing, the administering of doses too small to cause adverse reactions, can be used in human volunteers, whose blood is then analyzed. Artificial human skin, such as the commercially available products EpiDerm and ThinCert, is made from sheets of human skin cells grown in test tubes or plastic wells and can produce more useful results than testing chemicals on animal skin. Microfluidic chips ("organs on a chip"), which are lined with human cells and recreate the functions of human organs, are in advanced stages of development. Computer models, such as virtual reconstructions of human molecular structures, can predict the toxicity of substances without invasive experiments on animals.

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Important Information : Telephone line and Power supply down at Blue Cross of India , In the process of digging for Metro-water work happening on the road to Blue Cross they have cut the electrical and telephone cables . As a result of this we don't have any power supply and are running on Genset power intermittently. Also the telephone lines are down so temporarily no one is able to get in touch with us. Kindly bear with us till the situation is sorted out . We will update as soon as this is rectified. ... See MoreSee Less

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