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captainThe Blue Cross of India was established in 1959 and registered as a Society under the Societies Registration Act in 1964 to alleviate the suffering of animals. It has grown from small beginnings to become one of India's largest animal welfare organisations, running active animal welfare, animal rights and humane education programmes.

 

To ensure that all monies received by the Society are used primarily for animal welfare activities, the administration and non-medical activities of the Blue Cross of India are almost entirely looked after by members who donate their time and expertise on a purely honorary basis.

 

The work of the Blue Cross has received national and international recognition. Its Office Bearers have served on many State and Central Government Committees over the last forty years.

 

Captain V. Sundaram was a member of the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) in the nineteen sixties and again in the eighties. His work was recognized by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals as early as 1963 when he was awarded their Queen Victoria Medal. In 1964, he was awarded the Madras SPCA's Silver Medal and in 1991, the Watumall Foundation of Hawaii bestowed their award for his animal welfare activities. The Mylapore Academy and many others honoured him. The Government of India conferred their Prani Mitra award on him in 1997.

 

Dr. S. Chinny Krishna was a member of the AWBI from 1994 to 1997 and in 2001 he was made the Vice Chairman of the AWBI. In the same year, he was awarded the Jeev Daya Puraskar by the Government of India. In 2002, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Venu Menon Animal Allies Foundation from the Vice President of India, Mr. Krishna Kant. From 1996 to 2002, Dr. Krishna served as a member of the Central Government's Committee for the Purpose of Control and Supervision of Experiments on Animals and as Chairman of several of its sub-committees. Several Lions and Rotary Clubs have recognised his work for animals as has the International Governor of Lions Clubs International who recognised his work for animals in 1987. He was the first District Chairman for Animal Welfare in the seventy-year history of Lionism when Lion S. T. Vanchinathan was the District Governor of Lions District 324.

 

Governing Body members have served on the Central Zoo Authority and on Mr. Sam Pitroda's Street Dog Mission appointed by Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi and on State Animal Welfare Boards.

 

The AWBI granted recognition in 1966. The Blue Cross is affiliated to the RSPCA and WSPA.

 

Locations

  • Registered Office: 1 Eldams Road, Chennai 600 018, India
  • Guindy – Hospital, shelters, ambulance services and ABC centre at 72 Velachery Road, Guindy, Chennai 600 032
  • Lloyds Road ABC centre – Lloyds Colony, Chennai 600 005
  • St. Thomas Mount Cantonment – ABC centre
  • Kunnam centre in Kanchipuram District – Hospital, shelters and ABC centre
  • Toducadu – ABC centre for Thiruvellore District

People

  • Founders
  • Office Bearers & Members

Activities

  • Medical waste disposal
  • Shelters
  • Rehoming
  • Adoptathon
  • ABC
  • Hospitals
  • Mobile Dispensary
  • Work with Other NGOs
  • Ambulance Services
  • Other Blue Cross Org.

Achievements

  • Course in Wild Avian Management
  • Animal Experimentation Rules
  • Banning of Dissection
  • CPCSEA
  • Education Programs
  • Projects
  • Animals in Films
  • Performing Animals
  • Animal Experimentation

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Facebook Posts

Animals can suffer like humans do, so it is speciesism to experiment on them while we refrain from experimenting on humans. All suffering is undesirable, whether it be in humans or animals. Discriminating against animals because they do not have the cognitive ability, language, or moral judgment that humans do is no more justifiable than discriminating against human beings with severe mental impairments. As English philosopher Jeremy Bentham wrote in the 1700s, "The question is not, Can they reason? nor, Can they talk? but, Can they suffer?"

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Animal tests do not reliably predict results in human beings. 94% of drugs that pass animal tests fail in human clinical trials. According to neurologist Aysha Akhtar, MD, MPH, over 100 stroke drugs that were effective when tested on animals have failed in humans, and over 85 HIV vaccines failed in humans after working well in non-human primates. A 2013 study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) found that nearly 150 clinical trials of treatments to reduce inflammation in critically ill patients have been undertaken, and all of them failed, despite being successful in animal tests. A 2013 study in Archives of Toxicology stated that "The low predictivity of animal experiments in research areas allowing direct comparisons of mouse versus human data puts strong doubt on the usefulness of animal data as key technology to predict human safety."

Help Blue Cross of India to be the voice for the voiceless. Help us to support rescued and abandoned. Send us your donation to:

Online donation:
bluecrossofindia.org/donate.html

--Your LIKES, COMMENTS & SHARES will help Blue Cross of India to reach more animal lovers and spread information of animal welfare and rights.

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Drugs that pass animal tests are not necessarily safe. The 1950s sleeping pill thalidomide, which caused 10,000 babies to be born with severe deformities, was tested on animals prior to its commercial release. Animal tests on the arthritis drug Vioxx showed that it had a protective effect on the hearts of mice, yet the drug went on to cause more than 27,000 heart attacks and sudden cardiac deaths before being pulled from the market.

Help Blue Cross of India to be the voice for the voiceless. Help us to support rescued and abandoned. Send us your donation to:

Online donation:
bluecrossofindia.org/donate.html

--Your LIKES, COMMENTS & SHARES will help Blue Cross of India to reach more animal lovers and spread information of animal welfare and rights.

Thank you animal lovers! 😃
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Animals are very different from human beings and therefore make poor test subjects. The anatomic, metabolic, and cellular differences between animals and people make animals poor models for human beings. Paul Furlong, Professor of Clinical Neuroimaging at Aston University (UK), states that "it's very hard to create an animal model that even equates closely to what we're trying to achieve in the human." Thomas Hartung, Professor of evidence-based toxicology at Johns Hopkins University, argues for alternatives to animal testing because "we are not 70 kg rats."

Help Blue Cross of India to be the voice for the voiceless. Help us to support rescued and abandoned. Send us your donation to:

Online donation:
bluecrossofindia.org/donate.html

--Your LIKES, COMMENTS & SHARES will help Blue Cross of India to reach more animal lovers and spread information of animal welfare and rights.

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Stop Animal testing!
Use alternative testing methods!

Alternative testing methods now exist that can replace the need for animals. In vitro (in glass) testing, such as studying cell cultures in a petri dish, can produce more relevant results than animal testing because human cells can be used. Microdosing, the administering of doses too small to cause adverse reactions, can be used in human volunteers, whose blood is then analyzed. Artificial human skin, such as the commercially available products EpiDerm and ThinCert, is made from sheets of human skin cells grown in test tubes or plastic wells and can produce more useful results than testing chemicals on animal skin. Microfluidic chips ("organs on a chip"), which are lined with human cells and recreate the functions of human organs, are in advanced stages of development. Computer models, such as virtual reconstructions of human molecular structures, can predict the toxicity of substances without invasive experiments on animals.

Help Blue Cross of India to be the voice for the voiceless. Help us to support rescued and abandoned. Send us your donation to:

Online donation:
bluecrossofindia.org/donate.html

--Your LIKES, COMMENTS & SHARES will help Blue Cross of India to reach more animal lovers and spread information of animal welfare and rights.

Thank you animal lovers! 😃
Thank you for your support!
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Important Information : Telephone line and Power supply down at Blue Cross of India , In the process of digging for Metro-water work happening on the road to Blue Cross they have cut the electrical and telephone cables . As a result of this we don't have any power supply and are running on Genset power intermittently. Also the telephone lines are down so temporarily no one is able to get in touch with us. Kindly bear with us till the situation is sorted out . We will update as soon as this is rectified. ... See MoreSee Less

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