Activities of Blue Cross of India

Our projects consist of medical waste disposal, shelters, rehoming animals, adoption drives, ABC (animal birth control), hospitals, mobile dispensary, working with other NGOs, ambulance services and so on.

Blue Cross of India's activities comprise a wide range of pro-animal welfare and rights.

Go down this page and see the progress of the Blue Cross over the years

Medical waste disposal

Activities of Blue Cross of India: Medical Waste Disposal

lue Cross of India has always been particular about managing bio-medical waste ethically. GJ Multiclave India Pvt Ltd helps us achieve this at subsidized costs by waiving the usual collection fee.

The company has been clearing bio-medical waste from over 170 hospitals in and around Chennai. BCI is the only animal hospital and shelter, which has collaborated with them to handle disposables such as used cotton, bandages, needle sharps, syringes, gloves, IV bottles and more.

The waste is segregated into three categories — red bags denote plastic and other non-biodegradable material, yellow is for degradable waste like soft tissues, surgically removed anatomical parts, and other solids are put into a transparent white container for. This is cleared every day and incinerated, autoclaved, shredded or securely land filled.

Mr Sanjay who heads the company can be contacted at 044 22413016 or 9381068642 or at ctf@hotmail.com

We're indeed grateful to them for having waived the usual fee for collection after they visited us and realised the work and volume that went into our day to day activities.

Shelters

Activities of Blue Cross of India: Shelter for animals

Every year, nearly 3,000 stray animals are rescued and brought to Blue Cross of India for medical treatment, and we provide shelter and nutritious food to help them recuperate. While cattle, dogs and cats are the main categories of animals at our shelters, birds, white mice, squirrels, horses, donkeys, deer and even a monitor lizard have found temporary refuge with us. Despite the severe space constraint and low resources, we have never turned away an unwell or injured animal.

Activities of Blue Cross of India: Shelter for Cows and buffalos

While cattle, dogs and cats are the main categories of animals at our shelters, birds, white mice, squirrels, horses, donkeys, deer and even a monitor lizard have found temporary homes with us. All stray cattle rounded up by the Corporation of Madras and not claimed by their owners within 15 days are now handed over to us. These cattle were formerly auctioned by the Corporation and usually ended up in the slaughter house. They are now relocated to pinjrapoles (home for old animals) in Mysore, Bangalore, Vellore and other places at substantial expense to the Blue Cross.

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Rehoming

All stray cattle rounded up by the Corporation of Madras and not claimed by their owners within 15 days are handed over to Blue Cross of India. These cattle were formerly auctioned by the Corporation and usually ended up in the slaughter house, but now, they find safe homes in pinjrapoles (home for geriatric animals) across Mysuru, Bengaluru, Vellore and other places.

In addition, abandoned pets found in public spaces and pets that have lost their way have been taken in and rehomed or reunited with their families.
Though providing foster care for these animals comes at a substantial cost, we continue to serve them. In fact, of more than 3,000 animals, only one-third find forever homes.

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Go down this page to see the progress of the Blue Cross over the years.

ABC – Animal Birth Control (ABC)

ABC (animal birth control): Blue Cross of India specializes in performing the Animal Birth Control (ABC) surgery for all the dogs that come to us for treatment, or are brought for ABC by owners.

Apart from this, since 1995, the Chennai Corporation has been sending stray dogs to us specifically for the surgery. The process of this programme is such that a dog is picked up, tagged and brought back to our hospital-cum-shelter. After a thorough check-up and confirmation that the animal is ready for surgery, it is neutered (males) or spayed (females), housed and fed till the sutures are removed. Then the dog is de-wormed, vaccinated and released in same location where it was picked up from. During the surgery, the tip of one ear is tattooed/notched to label the dog as ‘sterelized’. On each trip, one of our supervisors accompanies the pickup van to ensure proper execution of the programme.

The benefits of the ABC programme are:

  1. Long-term solution to control the population of stray dogs – all over the world, it has been found that mass culling of strays has never led to a reduction of population. This is because dogs from neighbouring areas will move in to fill the vacuum created by the removal of stray dogs in one area. Second, the number of strays will go up rapidly because of increased availability of food and territory. So, mass sterilization of animals is the ideal, ethical solution.
  2. Prevention of negative changes in behavior – often, dogs display aggression when trying to find a mate or marking their territory. ABC will help prevent this change in temperament, but the dogs must be released in the same locality after surgery to ensure this. Releasing them in strange surroundings will make them more aggressive and less sociable. It places like India, many stray dogs are tended to by the community, and hence leaving them back in the same area will ensure that they are looked after well.
  3. Eradication of rabies – stray dogs can be affected by communicable diseases like rabies, putting humans and themselves in danger. As part of ABC, the animals are vaccinated against multiple diseases and hence will not pose any risk of transmission. So far, we have successfully sterilized over thousands dogs annually (for a span of 55 years) at a cost of Rs. 1,000 per animal.

    This would not have been possible without:

    Rukmini Devi Arundale Trust (RDAT), who donated a mobile surgery van to us. Grants from Animal Welfare Board of India, Alice Morgan Wright-Edith Goode Fund of the HSUS, USA, Marchig Animal Welfare Trust and RSPCA, England.  Support from RS Bharathi, Chairman, Alandur Municipality, Mallika Ravindar, Gouhar Aziz and the management of VGP Golden Beach Resort

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Hospitals

ur hospital in Guindy works on all 365 days of the year and we treat nearly 35000 animals annually. Apart from nine veterinarians, who attend to cases during the day, a doctor is on duty to attend to emergency cases at night. Specialists for any particular surgeries/treatment are invited when required.
Like all our other activities, the hospital provides free medical treatment to all injured/unwell stray animals. Only owners, who bring their pets for vaccination are charged as per MRP.

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Mobile Dispensary

March 31, 1998

In addition to the ABC operations carried out at the Hospital, ABC operations have been started in village areas around Madras from April 1, 1996 with the co-operation of the Rukmini Devi Arundale Trust who have made available a fully equipped mobile surgery and clinic on wheels. The capital outlay of this project as well as the running expenses including the salaries of the surgeon, driver and attender and the cost of medicines are being met by the Trust. Operations were done in Pallavakkam, Chitlapakkam, Tambaram, Injambakkam and Guindy.

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Work with Other NGOs

March 31, 1998

The surgeons of the Blue Cross, especially Dr T. P. Sekar, spent a great deal of time and effort in training surgeons working for other non-governmental organisations (NG0s) in spaying/neutering. Dog catchers from Patna were trained by them in more humane methods of catching dogs, with the help of the Corporation of Madras. The expenses for this program were met by the Animal Welfare Board, India.

Last year, in co-ordination with the Animal Welfare Board of India and other NG0s, an ambitious plan had been drawn up to completely stop the destruction of stray dogs by the Corporation of Chennai and, in its place, set up mass sterilization programs. The Corporation converted their existing dog pound for this and have stopped electrocution of stray animals.

From April 1, 1995, dogs caught by the Corporation in South Chennai, on two days per week, are handed over to the Blue Cross for sterilization and vaccination. Each dog is tagged when caught, so as to be returned to the exact spot from where it was collected, after spaying, deforming and protection against rabies. Thanks to other NG0s joining in, it is hoped to bring down the number of street dogs substantially before the year 2000. Results in South Madras have been beyond expectations.

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Ambulance Services

March 31, 1998

Activities of Blue Cross of India: Operating Ambulance gifted by Lions Club

1998:The ambulance donated by the Lions Clubs of Madras in 1987

Only two ambulances are now available round the clock. 4,823 animals were rescued by the ambulances during 1997-98. In addition, 1316 street dogs were released after the ABC operations using these vehicles.

Activities of Blue Cross of India: Ambulance in operation

1985: A Standard 20 ambulance donated by the Blue Cross to the Police Department. On the right is the Morris ambulance donated in 1965 by the Scottish Society for the Prevention of Vivisection; Animal Defenders and Antivivisection Society; National Anti-Vivisection Society and the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection (all of the UK)

The Lions ambulance was taken out of service last year after 12 years. During that time it had helped over 17,000 animals in distress. All efforts are being made to get a replacement ambulance to cope with the large number of calls received.

Activities of Blue Cross of India: Operating Ambulance gifted by Citibank

Top: The first ambulance with a hydraulic lifter bought in 1994 and below: an ambulance donated in 1995 by the Lions Club of Mylapore, running costs of which were sponsored by CITIBANK for a year.

  • 1965: A Morris ambulance was donated by the Scottish Society for the Prevention of Vivisection, Animal Defenders and Antivivisection Society, National Anti-Vivisection Society and British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection — all based in UK
  • 1985: A Standard 20 ambulance was donated by Blue Cross of India to the Police Department
  • 1987: Lions Clubs of Madras donated an ambulance to BCI. It was taken out of service after 12 years, during which it helped rescue over 17,000 animals in distress.
  • 1994: The first ambulance with a hydraulic lifter was bought
  • 1995: An ambulance was donated by the Lions Club of Mylapore, for which CITIBANK sponsored running costs for a year

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Other Blue Cross Org.

Blue Cross of India extends whatever help is possible in providing a model Memorandum and Articles of Association, Statements of Policy, Bye-laws and so on, to cut down the initial paper work required to register a new organization. Special items such as graspers, gloves and other animal handling equipment, hospital and surgical equipment and humane education material including computer programs are given to some of these new organizations, and other animal welfare NGOs across the world.

With our assistance, Blue Cross of Hyderabad, Blue Cross of Guwahati, Blue Cross of Patna, Blue Cross Society of Madhubani, Blue Cross Society of Hissar, Blue Cross Society of Assam, Blue Cross Society of Pondicherry, Blue Cross Society of Gopalganj and Blue Cross of Coimbatore have come into existence.

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